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frost
out-apiary guidelines?

I've been in touch with someone local who wants to host one or more of my beehives. My understanding is that the usual arrangement is that they get a number of jars of honey out of it.
What safety and other guidelines are there about doing this? For example, do I need warning signs, fences, or what other best practices are there? Also, does my insurance (the standard one that we all get through our associations which i assume is through FIBKA) cover me/the host for this?
Thanks!

Bees and Honey
Mike, You are covered by

Mike,
You are covered by the FIBKA policy. It is a third party cover only for the beekeeper ("while engaged on beekeeping matters") his/her bees and products of the hive. Location is irrevelant.

Fencing would be based on need, will children and/or livestock have access to the hives?

From my own experience, warning signs only attract vandalism.
I hope this is helpful

Richie

frost
thanks richie. although

thanks richie. although these people are keen to have bees, they also are very cautious so i want to be sure i don't miss out on something that could potentially cause an issue. there are livestock so fencing will be needed certainly. i see your point about signs, and as this is in a rather isolated field it might be best to just disguise the hives rather than advertise them!

joctcl
Hi Mike, I have been asked by

Hi Mike,

I have been asked by people with orchards about relocating hives next year.
I think biggest issue is not so much local population as my neighbours haven't even noticed my hives and their back door is 50 yards away but damage from livestock especialy young bullocks who are always nosey and won't thing anything of going through temporary fencing, badgers are the same. Alledgedly bees don't like the smell of horses. Watch out for farmers spraying in adjoining fields.
This all sounds like relocating bees in a suburban environment is best option, at least we don't have to worry about bears!!

Finally transportation and method is an important consideration, Philip McCabe (PR Guy for Fibka) tells a funny story when he first starting keeping bees in Louth and had them "loose" on the back seat of his car in the 60's. He was unsuited and throttling down a country road before it got dark. He came around a corner into a heard of heifers being driven between fields. He slammed on, hive seperated and pandemonium ensued, where bees proceeded to sting him as he lept from the car, the farmer and all the cattle. He has a particulary good description of the faces of the people coming across the scene in subsequent vehicles as he and 50 head of cattle jumping and kicking running towards them! He also pointed out was this was before lawsuits came to Ireland!
John